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Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental

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Sia Kate Isobelle Furler (/ˈsiːə/ SEE-ə; born 18 December 1975) is an Australian singer, songwriter, record producer and music video director. She started her career as a singer in the acid jazz band Crisp in the mid-1990s in Adelaide. In 1997, when Crisp disbanded, she released her debut studio album titled OnlySee in Australia, but it did not sell well. She moved to London, England, and provided lead vocals for the British duo Zero 7.
In 2000, Sia released her second studio album, Healing Is Difficult, the following year, but was displeased with the promotion of the record. She released her next studio album, Colour the Small One, in 2004, but it struggled to connect with a mainstream audience. Sia relocated to New York City in 2005 and toured in the United States. Her fourth and fifth studio albums, Some People Have Real Problems and We Are Born, were released in 2008 and 2010, respectively. She took a hiatus from performing, during which she focused on songwriting for other artists, producing successful collaborations “Titanium” (with David Guetta), “Diamonds” (with Rihanna) and “Wild Ones” (with Flo Rida).
In 2014, Sia finally broke through as a solo recording artist when her sixth studio album, 1000 Forms of Fear, debuted at No 1 in the U.S. Billboard 200 and generated the top-ten single “Chandelier” and a trilogy of music videos starring child dancer Maddie Ziegler. In 2016, she released her seventh studio album This Is Acting, which spawned her first Hot 100 number one single, “Cheap Thrills”. The same year, Sia gave her Nostalgic for the Present Tour, which incorporated performance art elements. Among the accolades received by Sia are ARIA Awards and an MTV Video Music Award.[2]
Sia Kate Isobelle Furler was born on 18 December 1975 in Adelaide, South Australia. Her father, Phil Colson, is a musician, and her mother, Loene Furler, is an art lecturer. Sia is the niece of actor-singer Kevin Colson.[4] Sia said that as a child she imitated the performing style of Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder and Sting, whom she cites as early influences.[5] She attended Adelaide High School. In the mid-1990s, Sia started a career as a singer in the local acid jazz band Crisp.[3] Sia collaborated with the band and contributed vocals to their album Word and the Deal (1996) and EP Delirium (1997).[6] In 1997 Crisp disbanded, and Sia released her debut studio album, OnlySee, on Flavoured Records, in Australia, on 23 December.The album sold 1,200 copies.[9][10] Unlike her later albums, OnlySee was marketed under her full name, “Sia Furler”. It was produced by Jesse Flavell. The song “Soon” was re-recorded by Sia as “Sober and Unkissed” and featured on her 2001 album Healing Is Difficult. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
After Crisp disbanded in 1997, Sia moved to London, where she performed as a background vocalist for British band Jamiroquai.[12] She also provided lead vocals for English downtempo group Zero 7 on their first three studio albums and toured with the group. On Zero 7’s 2001 album Simple Things, Sia contributed vocals to two tracks: “Destiny” and “Distractions.”[14] The single “Destiny” peaked at No. 30 on the UK Singles Chart.[15] In 2004, she provided vocals for Zero 7 on “Somersault” and “Speed Dial No. 2” (from the album When It Falls). In 2006, Sia again collaborated with Zero 7 for the group’s third album, The Garden and hence she is regarded as the “unofficial” lead singer of Zero 7.
In 2000, Sia signed a recording contract with Sony Music’s sub-label Dance Pool and released her first single, “Taken for Granted”, which peaked at No. 10 on the UK Singles Chart. In 2001, she released her second solo album, Healing Is Difficult, which blends retro jazz and soul music and lyrically discusses Sia’s dealing with the death of her first love affair.[7][19] Displeased with the promotion of the album, Sia fired her manager, left Sony Music and signed with Go! Beat, a subsidiary of Universal Music Group (UMG). At the APRA Awards of 2002, Sia won the Breakthrough Songwriter category alongside Brisbane pop duo Aneiki’s Jennifer Waite and Grant Wallis. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
In 2004, Sia released her third studio album, Colour the Small One.[21] The album employs a mixture of acoustic instruments and electronic backing to her material. The album spawned four singles: “Don’t Bring Me Down”, “Breathe Me”, “Where I Belong” and “Numb”. “Breathe Me” peaked at No. 71 in the United Kingdom, No. 19 in Denmark and No. 81 in France.[23] “Where I Belong” was scheduled to be included on the soundtrack for the film Spider-Man 2; however, owing to a record label conflict, it was withdrawn at the last minute. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
Dissatisfied with Colour the Small One’s poor marketing and the album’s struggle to connect with a mainstream audience, Sia relocated to New York City in 2005. During that time, “Breathe Me” appeared in the final scene of the U.S. HBO television series Six Feet Under, which helped increase Sia’s fame in the United States. Consequently, Sia’s manager, David Enthoven, set up a tour across the country to maintain her career.
In 2007, Sia released a live album entitled Lady Croissant, which included eight live songs from her April 2006 performance at the Bowery Ballroom in New York and one new studio recording—”Pictures”.[26] A year later, she left Zero 7 on friendly terms, replaced by Eska Mtungwazi as the band’s frontwoman. Sia released her fourth studio album, Some People Have Real Problems on 8 January 2008. The album peaked at No. 41 in Australia and was certified gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association. It charted at No. 26 on the US Billboard 200, becoming Sia’s first album to chart in the United States. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
Some People Have Real Problems yielded four singles. The lead single, “Day Too Soon”, was released in November 2007 and peaked at No. 24 on the US Hot Dance Club Songs. The second single, “The Girl You Lost to Cocaine”, was made available in March 2008.The single peaked at No. 11 in the Netherlands and No. 12 in Spain; it additionally reached No. 8 on the US Hot Dance Club Songs. The third single from the album, “Soon We’ll Be Found”, was made available in October 2008. The Bart Hendrix Deep Dope remix of “Buttons” was issued as the final single from Some People Have Real Problems in February 2009.
In May 2009, Sia released TV Is My Parent on DVD, which includes a live concert at New York’s Hiro Ballroom, four music videos and behind-the-scene footage. At the ARIA Music Awards of 2009, Sia won the Best Music DVD category for TV Is My Parent. She also received a nomination for Best Breakthrough Artist Album for Some People Have Real Problems.
In 2009, American singer Christina Aguilera approached Sia about writing ballads for Aguilera’s then-upcoming sixth studio album.[38] The final product, Bionic, includes three songs co-written by Sia. Later in 2010, Sia also co-wrote “Bound to You” for the soundtrack of the American film Burlesque, which starred Aguilera and American singer Cher.[40] The song was nominated for Best Original Song at the 68th Golden Globe Awards. In May 2011, Sia appeared on the inaugural season of the U.S. version of The Voice as an adviser for Aguilera, who served as a vocal coach and judge.
In June 2010, Sia released her fifth studio album, We Are Born. The release peaked at No. 2 on the ARIA Albums Chart and was certified gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association.The release of the album was preceded by three singles: the lead single, “You’ve Changed”, was released in December 2009 and charted at No. 31 in Australia.[44] The follow-up single, “Clap Your Hands”, was made available in June 2010 and became the album’s best-charting single, peaking at No. 17 in Australia, No. 10 in the Netherlands and No. 27 in Switzerland.[45] “Bring Night” was issued as the final single from the project in September 2010, peaking at No. 99 in Australia.[46] Producer Greg Kurstin worked with Sia on the album.[47] At the ARIA Music Awards of 2010, We Are Born earned Sia two categories won: Best Independent Release and Best Pop Release.[48] Meanwhile, at the 2011 APRA Music Awards, Sia received a nomination for Song of the Year for “Clap Your Hands”.[49] To promote We Are Born, Sia embarked on the We Meaning You Tour, which visited North America and Europe in April–May 2010.[50] The first show of the tour at the Commadore Ballroom in Vancouver, Canada was cancelled after five songs when the singer had to retire due to heat exhaustion. She followed this with the We Are Born Tour, which visited Australia in February 2011 and North America in July–August 2011. In March 2012, Sia released the greatest hits album Best Of… in Australia.
Following the success of We Are Born, Sia became uncomfortable with her growing fame. She later told The New York Times: “I just wanted to have a private life. Once, as my friend was telling me they had cancer, someone came up and asked, in the middle of the conversation, if they could take a photograph with me. You get me? That’s enough, right?”[55] She refused to do promos for her tours, began to wear a mask on stage and became increasingly dependent on drugs and alcohol on the road; she considered suicide.[55] Sia fired Enthoven and hired Jonathan Daniel, who suggested that she write songs for other artists. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
She retired as a recording artist and began a career as a songwriter. She soon penned “Titanium” for American singer Alicia Keys, but it was later sent to David Guetta, who included Sia’s original demo vocals on the song and released it as a single in 2011. “Titanium” peaked within the top ten of record charts in the United States, Australia and numerous European regions. However, Sia was not pleased with the success of the single: “[…] I never even knew it was gonna happen, and I was really upset. Because I had just retired, I was trying to be a pop songwriter, not an artist.”[56] From 2011 to 2013, Sia also co-wrote songs for many recording artists, including Beyoncé, Kylie Minogue, Flo Rida and Rihanna.[58] Her collaboration with Flo Rida, “Wild Ones”, peaked at No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was the tenth best-selling song of 2012 globally. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
2013–2014: Breakthrough with 1000 Forms of Fear
In October 2013, Sia released “Elastic Heart” featuring The Weeknd and Diplo for the soundtrack of the American film The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013). Sia executive produced Brooke Candy’s debut EP, Opulence, released in May 2014, and co-wrote 3 songs on the EP. In July 2014, Sia released her own sixth studio album, 1000 Forms of Fear.[62] She again collaborated with Greg Kurstin. The album debuted at No. 1 in the US Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 52,000 copies.By October 2015, it was certified gold by the RIAA denoting 500,000 equivalent-album units sold in the United States. The record peaked at No. 1 in Australia and reached the top ten of charts in numerous European regions.[65] It was certified silver by the British Phonographic Industry and gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association.[66] By early 2016, the album had sold 1 million copies worldwide.
1000 Forms of Fear’s lead single, “Chandelier” was released in March 2014. The song peaked at No. 8 on the US Billboard Hot 100, becoming Sia’s first entry on that chart as a lead artist. Elsewhere, the song experienced similar commercial success, ranking in the top ten of the record charts in Australia and numerous European regions. As of January 2015, the single had sold 2 million copies in the United States. “Eye of the Needle” and “Big Girls Cry” were released as the second and third singles from the album, respectively, in June 2014. In January 2015, Sia released a solo version of “Elastic Heart” as the fourth single from 1000 Forms of Fear; it eventually reached the top 20 on the Hot 100. At the 57th Annual Grammy Awards (2015), Sia received four nominations for “Chandelier”: Record of the Year, Song of the Year, Best Pop Solo Performance and Best Music Video. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
For live performances of songs from 1000 Forms of Fear, Sia chose not to show her face, either facing away from audiences or hiding it behind oversized platinum blonde wigs. In videos for the singles “Chandelier”, “Elastic Heart” and “Big Girls Cry”, choreographed by Ryan Heffington and co-directed by Sia and Daniel Askill, and in many of the promotional live performances, child dancer Maddie Ziegler performed as a proxy for Sia in bobbed blonde wigs similar to Sia’s familiar hairstyle. The three videos have received a total of more than 3 billion views on Vevo. Sia explained to Kristen Wiig in an interview in Interview magazine that she decided to conceal her face to avoid a celebrity lifestyle and maintain some privacy: “I’m trying to have some control over my image. And I’m allowed to maintain some modicum of privacy. But also I would like not to be picked apart or for people to observe when I put on ten pounds or take off ten pounds or I have a hair extension out of place or my fake tan is botched. Most people don’t have to be under that pressure, and I’d like to be one of them.” The video for Elastic Heart “courted controversy and plaudits in equal measure”, with some commentators perceiving it to have pedophilic undertones due to the relative ages of the dancers.Sia explained that the two dancers represented “warring ‘Sia’ self states”, but she nevertheless apologized on Twitter to anyone who was “triggered”.Gia Kourlas wrote in The New York Times in 2016 that Sia’s collaborations with Heffington have “done more to raise the standards of dance in pop music than nearly any current artist integrating the forms”.
Pop music is a genre of popular music that originated in its modern form in the Western world during the 1950s and 1960s[not verified in body] as a softer alternative to rock and roll. The terms “popular music” and “pop music” are often used interchangeably, although the former describes all music that is popular and includes many styles. “Pop” and “rock” were synonymous terms until the late 1960s, when they were increasingly used in opposition from each other.
Although pop music is seen as just the singles charts, it is not the sum of all chart music. Pop music is eclectic, and often borrows elements from other styles such as urban, dance, rock, Latin, and country; nonetheless, there are core elements that define pop music. Identifying factors include generally short to medium-length songs written in a basic format (often the verse-chorus structure), as well as the common use of repeated choruses, melodic tunes, and hooks.
David Hatch and Stephen Millward define pop music as “a body of music which is distinguishable from popular, jazz, and folk musics”.According to Pete Seeger, pop music is “professional music which draws upon both folk music and fine arts music”. Although pop music is seen as just the singles charts, it is not the sum of all chart music. The music charts contain songs from a variety of sources, including classical, jazz, rock, and novelty songs. Pop music, as a genre, is seen as existing and developing separately. Thus “pop music” may be used to describe a distinct genre, aimed at a youth market, often characterized as a softer alternative to rock and roll. Musicologist Allan Moore surmises that the term “pop music” itself may have originated from Pop art. Additionally, it’s important to note that pop music is always evolving, which means that the definition of pop music can change, too. It’s also important to be cognizant of the distinction between pop music and popular music. According to The New Grove Dictionary Of Music and Musicians, popular music is defined as “the music since industrialization in the 1800’s that is most in line with the tastes and interests of the urban middle class.”
The Oxford Dictionary of Music states that the term “pop” refers to music performed by such artists as the Rolling Stones (pictured here in a 2006 performance) Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
The term “pop song” was first recorded as being used in 1926, in the sense of a piece of music “having popular appeal”.However,[editorializing] the term was in mainstream use[not in citation given] at least ten years earlier. Hatch and Millward indicate that many events in the history of recording in the 1920s can be seen as the birth of the modern pop music industry, including in country, blues and hillbilly music.
According to the website of The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, called Grove Music Online, the term “pop music” “originated in Britain in the mid-1950s as a description for rock and roll and the new youth music styles that it influenced”. The Oxford Dictionary of Music states that while pop’s “earlier meaning meant concerts appealing to a wide audience … since the late 1950s, however, pop has had the special meaning of non-classical mus[ic], usually in the form of songs, performed by such artists as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, ABBA, etc”. Grove Music Online also states that “… in the early 1960s [the term] ‘pop music’ competed terminologically with beat music [in England], while in the USA its coverage overlapped (as it still does) with that of ‘rock and roll'”. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
From about 1967, the term was increasingly used in opposition to the term rock music, a division that gave generic significance to both terms.Whereas rock aspired to authenticity and an expansion of the possibilities of popular music, pop was more commercial, ephemeral and accessible. According to British musicologist Simon Frith, pop music is produced “as a matter of enterprise not art”, is “designed to appeal to everyone” and “doesn’t come from any particular place or mark off any particular taste”. It is “not driven by any significant ambition except profit and commercial reward … and, in musical terms, it is essentially conservative”. It is, “provided from on high (by record companies, radio programmers, and concert promoters) rather than being made from below … Pop is not a do-it-yourself music but is professionally produced and packaged”. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
, “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” ranks as the most frequently played song in US radio history, described by music writers Nick Logan and Bob Woffinden as “the ultimate pop record”.
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According to Frith, characteristics of pop music include an aim of appealing to a general audience, rather than to a particular sub-culture or ideology, and an emphasis on craftsmanship rather than formal “artistic” qualities.[6] Music scholar Timothy Warner said it typically has an emphasis on recording, production, and technology, rather than live performance; a tendency to reflect existing trends rather than progressive developments; and aims to encourage dancing or uses dance-oriented rhythms. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
The main medium of pop music is the song, often between two and a half and three and a half minutes in length, generally marked by a consistent and noticeable rhythmic element, a mainstream style and a simple traditional structure. Common variants include the verse-chorus form and the thirty-two-bar form, with a focus on melodies and catchy hooks, and a chorus that contrasts melodically, rhythmically and harmonically with the verse. The beat and the melodies tend to be simple, with limited harmonic accompaniment. The lyrics of modern pop songs typically focus on simple themes – often love and romantic relationships – although there are notable exceptions.
Harmony and chord progressions in pop music are often “that of classical European tonality, only more simple-minded.” Clich?s include the barbershop quartet-style harmony (i.e. ii – V – I) and blues scale-influenced harmony. There was a lessening of the influence of traditional views of the circle of fifths between the mid-1950s and the late 1970s, including less predominance for the dominant function.
Throughout its development, pop music has absorbed influences from most other genres of popular music. Early pop music drew on the sentimental ballad for its form, gained its use of vocal harmonies from gospel and soul music, instrumentation from jazz, country, and rock music, orchestration from classical music, tempo from dance music, backing from electronic music, rhythmic elements from hip-hop music, and has recently[when?] appropriated spoken passages from rap. According to Robert Christgau in 2014, pop music worldwide is permeated by electronic dance music.
A Scientific Reports study that examined over 464,000 recordings of popular music recorded between 1955 and 2010 found less variety in pitch progressions, growing average loudness levels, less diverse instrumentation and recording techniques, and less timbral variety, which declined after reaching a peak in the 1960s. Scientific American’s John Matson reported that this “seems to support the popular anecdotal observation that pop music of yore was better, or at least more varied, than today’s top-40 stuff.” Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
Left, Michael Jackson in 1984; right, Madonna in 2008
In the 1940s improved microphone design allowed a more intimate singing style and ten or twenty years later inexpensive and more durable 45 r.p.m. records for singles “revolutionized the manner in which pop has been disseminated” and helped to move pop music to ‘a record/radio/film star system’. Another technological change was the widespread availability of television in the 1950s; with televised performances, “pop stars had to have a visual presence”.In the 1960s, the introduction of inexpensive, portable transistor radios meant that teenagers could listen to music outside of the home.Multi-track recording (from the 1960s); and digital sampling (from the 1980s) have also been utilized as methods for the creation and elaboration of pop music. By the early 1980s, the promotion of pop music had been greatly affected by the rise of music television channels like MTV, which “favoured those artists such as Michael Jackson and Madonna who had a strong visual appeal”.
The latter half of the 20th-century included a large-scale trend in American culture in which the boundaries between art and pop music were increasingly blurred.[27] Between 1950 and 1970, there was a debate of pop versus art.[28] Since then, certain music publications have embraced its legitimacy. According to Popmatters’ Robert Loss: “There’s a strong argument for the ‘rockist’ mode in music criticism—that it exists, and that it’s harmful—and poptimism has positioned itself as a corrective, an antidote. … In general the Old Guard of rock critics and journalists is depicted as a bunch of bricklayers for the foundations of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. True in part, which is to say, false. Like film studies, rock criticism of the late ‘60s and the ‘70s was an attempt to make popular music worthy of study; it was poptimism before its day.” Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
The story of pop music is largely the story of the intertwining pop culture of the United States and the United Kingdom in the postwar era. Sia Soon Well Be Found instrumental
Pop music has been dominated by the American and (from the mid-1960s) British music industries, whose influence has made pop music something of an international monoculture, but most regions and countries have their own form of pop music, sometimes producing local versions of wider trends, and lending them local characteristics. Some of these trends (for example Europop) have had a significant impact of the development of the genre.
According to Grove Music Online, “Western-derived pop styles, whether coexisting with or marginalizing distinctively local genres, have spread throughout the world and have come to constitute stylistic common denominators in global commercial music cultures”. Some non-Western countries, such as Japan, have developed a thriving pop music industry, most of which is devoted to Western-style pop, has for several years produced a greater quantity of music of everywhere except the USA. The spread of Western-style pop music has been interpreted variously as representing processes of Americanization, homogenization, modernization, creative appropriation, cultural imperialism, and/or a more general process of