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All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano

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All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano

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K-Ci & JoJo is an American R&B duo, consisting of brothers Cedric “K-Ci” Hailey (born September 2, 1969) and Joel “JoJo” Hailey (born June 10, 1971). Natives of Monroe, North Carolina, they are also the lead singers of the chart-topping R&B group Jodeci with the DeGrate brothers—Donald (better known as DeVante Swing) and Mr.Dalvin.
K-Ci and JoJo first landed on the scene as hit members of the R&B group Jodeci. K-Ci & JoJo’s first sign of independence came in 1994 when K-Ci covered Bobby Womack’s hit “If You Think You’re Lonely Now” for the movie Jason’s Lyric. Early in 1996, K-Ci & JoJo teamed up for the song “How Could You” for the movie Bulletproof starring Damon Wayans and Adam Sandler. By July 1996, K-Ci & JoJo were featured guest artists in 2Pac’s number-one R&B and Billboard Hot 100 hit “How Do U Want It”.
1997-98: Love Always
The brothers made their side projects into a full album, Love Always. Released on June 17, 1997, the album spawned two top-ten R&B hits: “You Bring Me Up” (Pop #26) and “Last Night’s Letter” (Pop #46). The minor success of those singles, however, paled in comparison to the success of the album’s third single, “All My Life” (which was dedicated to JoJo’s daughter). A supple, lush ballad far removed from the Jodeci material of the early 1990s, “All My Life” was the number-one song on the Hot 100 for three weeks, a feat that K-Ci & JoJo had never achieved with Jodeci. It features a piano melody similar to that of the piano found backing “Dancing In The Moonlight” by King Harvest.[citation needed] Future singles and albums would be crafted in the vein of “All My Life”, which was the duo’s only number-one hit, though many consider it one of the greatest jazz pop melodies of all time. Love Always went on to sell four million copies, and the success of the album put Jodeci’s reunion on hold indefinitely. During the recording of Love Always they also appeared in the song “I Care ‘Bout You” as a member of the R&B supergroup Milestone along with After 7 which appeared on the soundtrack for the movie, Soul Food that was written and produced by Babyface.
In 1998, K-Ci & JoJo recorded the song “Money Can’t Buy You Love,” which was produced for the film The Players Club.
In 1999, K-Ci & JoJo recorded “Life”, which was written and produced by R. Kelly, for the soundtrack to the Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence movie Life.
K-Ci & JoJo’s second studio album, It’s Real was released on June 22, 1999. It peaked at number eight on the Billboard 200,peaked at number two on the R&B/Hip Hop Albums,[4] and was certified platinum by the RIAA. Outside of the US, the album reached top 20 on the Dutch Mega Album Top 100, the Canadian Albums Chart, and appeared on the New Zealand Top 40 Albums and the ARIA Charts. The album spawned four singles, including the number-two Billboard song, “Tell Me It’s Real”.
K-Ci & JoJo returned with X on December 5, 2000. X, the Roman numeral for ten, was picked as the album title to celebrate the Haileys’ tenth anniversary in the music business. They made a strong return to the Billboard Hot 100 early in 2001 with the song “Crazy”, also included on the Save the Last Dance soundtrack. “Crazy” peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100. The album also features a hidden Jodeci track entitled “Slip And Fall”. Other tracks included “Honest Lover,” “One Last Time,” and “All the Things I Should Have Known” which Vibe magazine considered “convey a similar mix of hip hop collective that launched Del the Funky Homosapien.” All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano
The fourth K-Ci & JoJo album, Emotional, was released on November 26, 2002, but did not find commercial success. The CD consisted of two singles, “This Very Moment.” and the Rodney “Dark Child” Jerkins produced “It’s Me”. The album contained their personal favorite “How Long” written by Steve Vaughn and Jojo Hailey.
In late 2006, K-Ci released his debut solo album entitled My Book. K-Ci & JoJo released a greatest hits album on February 8, 2005. On February 6, 2008, they released their fifth compilation album called Love, which was released only in Japan.
2013-present: My Brother’s Keeper
In 2010, they signed an exclusive deal with R&B crooner Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds’ upstart Soda Pop Records, distributed through E1 Music. On June 25, 2013, they released their new single, “Knock It Off” via iTunes through E1 Music. On September 30, 2013, My Brother’s Keeper, was released.
On June 25, 2019, The New York Times Magazine listed K-Ci & JoJo among hundreds of artists whose material was reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire.
Pop music is a genre of popular music that originated in its modern form in the Western world during the 1950s and 1960s, deriving from rock and roll. The terms “popular music” and “pop music” are often used interchangeably, although the former describes all music that is popular (and can include any style).
Pop music is eclectic, and often borrows elements from other styles such as urban, dance, rock, Latin, and country; nonetheless, there are core elements that define pop music. Identifying factors include generally short to medium-length songs written in a basic format (often the verse-chorus structure) as well as the common employment of repeated choruses, melodic tunes, and hooks. All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano
David Hatch and Stephen Millward define pop music as “a body of music which is distinguishable from popular, jazz, and folk musics”. According to Pete Seeger, pop music is “professional music which draws upon both folk music and fine arts music”.Although pop music is seen as just the singles charts, it is not the sum of all chart music. The music charts contain songs from a variety of sources, including classical, jazz, rock, and novelty songs. Pop music, as a genre, is seen as existing and developing separately.Thus “pop music” may be used to describe a distinct genre, aimed at a youth market, often characterized as a softer alternative to rock and roll.
The Oxford Dictionary of Music states that the term “pop” refers to music performed by such artists as the Rolling Stones (pictured here in a 2006 performance)
The term “pop song” was first recorded as being used in 1926, in the sense of a piece of music “having popular appeal”.However, the term was in mainstream use at least ten years earlier. Hatch and Millward indicate that many events in the history of recording in the 1920s can be seen as the birth of the modern pop music industry, including in country, blues and hillbilly music. All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano
According to the website of The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, called Grove Music Online, the term “pop music” “originated in Britain in the mid-1950s as a description for rock and roll and the new youth music styles that it influenced The Oxford Dictionary of Music states that while pop’s “earlier meaning meant concerts appealing to a wide audience … since the late 1950s, however, pop has had the special meaning of non-classical mus[ic], usually in the form of songs, performed by such artists as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, ABBA, etc”. Grove Music Online also states that “… in the early 1960s [the term] ‘pop music’ competed terminologically with Beat music [in England], while in the USA its coverage overlapped (as it still does) with that of ‘rock and roll'”.
Throughout its development, pop music has absorbed influences from most other genres of popular music. Early pop music drew on the sentimental ballad for its form, gained its use of vocal harmonies from gospel and soul music, instrumentation from jazz, country, and rock music, orchestration from classical music, tempo from dance music, backing from electronic music, rhythmic elements from hip-hop music, and has recently appropriated spoken passages from rap.
It has also made use of technological innovation. In the 1940s improved microphone design allowed a more intimate singing style[13] and ten or twenty years later inexpensive and more durable 45 r.p.m. records for singles “revolutionized the manner in which pop has been disseminated” and helped to move pop music to ‘a record/radio/film star system’.[13] Another technological change was the widespread availability of television in the 1950s; with televised performances, “pop stars had to have a visual presence”. In the 1960s, the introduction of inexpensive, portable transistor radios meant that teenagers could listen to music outside of the home. Multi-track recording (from the 1960s); and digital sampling (from the 1980s) have also been utilized as methods for the creation and elaboration of pop music. By the early 1980s, the promotion of pop music had been greatly affected by the rise of music television channels like MTV, which “favoured those artists such as Michael Jackson and Madonna who had a strong visual appeal”.
According to several sources, MTV helped give rise to pop stars such as Michael Jackson and Madonna; and Jackson and Madonna All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano
Pop music has been dominated by the American and (from the mid-1960s) British music industries, whose influence has made pop music something of an international monoculture, but most regions and countries have their own form of pop music, sometimes producing local versions of wider trends, and lending them local characteristics. Some of these trends (for example Europop) have had a significant impact of the development of the genre.
According to Grove Music Online, “Western-derived pop styles, whether coexisting with or marginalizing distinctively local genres, have spread throughout the world and have come to constitute stylistic common denominators in global commercial music cultures”.Some non-Western countries, such as Japan, have developed a thriving pop music industry, most of which is devoted to Western-style pop, has for several years produced a greater quantity of music of everywhere except the USA.[20] The spread of Western-style pop music has been interpreted variously as representing processes of Americanization, homogenization, modernization, creative appropriation, cultural imperialism, and/or a more general process of globalization. Select subgeneres of pop such as the guitar-driven “Jank” subgenre have consciously reversed the trend toward homogenization by combining elements from world and classical music into more traditional pop structures.
According to British musicologist Simon Frith, characteristics of pop music include an aim of appealing to a general audience, rather than to a particular sub-culture or ideology, and an emphasis on craftsmanship rather than formal “artistic” qualities. Music scholar Timothy Warner said it typically has an emphasis on recording, production, and technology, rather than live performance; a tendency to reflect existing trends rather than progressive developments; and aims to encourage dancing or uses dance-oriented rhythms. All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano
The main medium of pop music is the song, often between two and a half and three and a half minutes in length, generally marked by a consistent and noticeable rhythmic element, a mainstream style and a simple traditional structure.[22] Common variants include the verse-chorus form and the thirty-two-bar form, with a focus on melodies and catchy hooks, and a chorus that contrasts melodically, rhythmically and harmonically with the verse. The beat and the melodies tend to be simple, with limited harmonic accompaniment.The lyrics of modern pop songs typically focus on simple themes – often love and romantic relationships – although there are notable exceptions. All My life K-Ci & JoJo Karaoke Piano
Harmony and chord progressions in pop music are often “that of classical European tonality, only more simple-minded.” and then to the tonic) and blues scale-influenced harmony. There was a lessening of the influence of traditional views of the circle of fifths between the mid-1950s and the late 1970s, including less predominance for the dominant function.
A study in 2012 that examined over 464,000 recordings of popular music recorded since 1955 found “three important trends in the evolution of musical discourse: the restriction of pitch sequences (with metrics showing less variety in pitch progressions), the homogenization of the timbral palette [tone colour] (with frequent timbres becoming more frequent), and growing average loudness levels (threatening a dynamic richness [changes in volume] that has been conserved until today).”[28] It was reported that the study “seems to support the popular anecdotal observation that pop music of yore was better, or at least more varied, than today’s top-40 stuff.